WWS Calendar

"Campaign '08: Race, Gender and Religion," topic of panel discussion, April 18

Apr 18, 2008 (All day)
Location: 
Friend Center
Auditorium 101

"Campaign '08: Race, Gender and Religion," will be the topic of a panel discussion at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 18, at the Friends Center Auditorium, room 101, on the Princeton University campus.

Panelists will include Frank Schaeffer, author of “Crazy for God: How I Grew Up as One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) of It Back;” Eddie S. Glaude, the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton; Robert George, the McCormick Chair in Jurisprudence and founding director of the James Madison Program at Princeton; and Barbara Savage, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania.

Frank Schaeffer is a New York Times best selling author. His latest book is a memoir, "Crazy for God: How I Grew Up As One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) of It Back." Schaeffer’s three semi-biographical novels about growing up in a fundamentalist mission: "Portofino," "Zermatt," "Saving Grandma" have a worldwide following and have been translated into 9 languages.

Eddie Glaude is the author of “Exodus! Religion, Race, and Nation in Early 19th Century Black America,” and editor of “Is it Nation Time? Contemporary Essays on Black Power and Black Nationalism.” His most recent book is "In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America "(Chicago Press, 2007).

Robert George is the McCormick Chair in Jurisprudence and is the founding director of the James Madison Program at Princeton. He is a member of the President's Council on Bioethics and formerly served as a presidential appointee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. He was a Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States, where he received the Justice Tom C. Clark Award.

Barbara Savage is the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1995. Her research and her teaching center on twentieth century African American political and religious history and the historical relationship between race, media, and politics.

This event is sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, the Center for African American Studies, the Center for the Study of Religion, the Department of Religion, the Office of Religious Life, the Black Student Union and the Princeton Public Library. It is free and open to the public.